Visit Acadia National Park with Metropolitan Shuttle


Views from atop Champlain Mountain are among the most beautiful on Mount Desert Island.


Summer is here: a time for camping, picnics, and taking in all the sunshine and greenery the season has to offer. Now is the perfect time to book a charter bus rental to Acadia National Park on Maine’s Mount Desert Island.

Acadia offers unmatched natural beauty, featuring forests, island lakes, and breathtaking mountains. Visitors can see the sunrise from Cadillac Mountain, bike along the miles of carriage road, or just relax among the woodland pines. Park events include island walks, boat cruises, falcon watching, biking tours, and an exploration of the “Missing Mansion,” the former home of park creator George Dorr.

Wildlife enthusiasts will find a treasure in Acadia: the islands are home to snowshoe hares, white-tailed deer, foxes, bobcats, black bears, bald eagles, owls, and more. Historical digs among the Indian sites in Acadia have found the remains of other animals as well, including cougars, gray wolves, and the now-extinct sea mink.

Acadia National Park covers over 49,000 acres of beautiful island country. Acadia is the oldest designated national park east of the Mississippi, having been christened as Sieur de Monts National Monument in 1916 before being renamed to Lafayette National Park in 1919 and Acadia in 1929.

A Brief History of Acadia

Long before the islands became a national park, Acadia was occupied by the Wabanaki, a Native American people that lived in Maine for over 12,000 years. The Wabanaki was a collection of four different tribes: the Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and the Penobscot. These natives hunted, gathered, fished, traded, and made their home in Acadia.

The creation of Acadia as a national park is credited to Charles W. Eliot. Eliot was a Harvard graduate who lobbied for the park when he learned that private land ownership might endanger public access to areas like Mount Desert Island. Eliot saw the incorporation of the Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations, which devoted itself to acquiring and holding the lands for public use. It was Eliot’s idea to treat the entire island like a park. This torch was later picked up by George B. Dorr, a “scholar and lover of nature” who dedicated his life to building and preserving Charles W. Eliot’s vision.

Seeing the Island

There’s something for everyone to enjoy in Acadia. Thousands flock to the park each year to see the sunrise and sunset over Cadillac Mountain, or take nighttime walks to view the shooting stars and hear the owl calls. While there is no on-site lodging, park and private campgrounds dot the islands for those who want to “rough it” in a tent under the open sky. Visitors can walk or take a free bus to the Bass Harbor Head Light, a historic lighthouse on Mount Desert Island, or explore the 27-mile Park Loop Road to see breathtaking views of the shoreline and mountains.

For wildlife lovers who want a more reserved experience, the Wild Gardens of Acadia packs the abundant bird and plant life of the island into a one-acre space. Take a guided historic cruise around Cranberry Island and then stop in at the Islesford Historical Museum to learn more about the park and its inhabitants. Afterward, guests can dine in the Jordan Pond House Restaurant, which serves lunch, tea and dinner from May to October.

Acadia is a perfect destination for a family reunion, weekend getaway, or camping trip with friends and relations. For easy, comfortable transportation to and from the island, consider a charter bus rental from Metropolitan Shuttle. Acadia is only four hours from Boston by charter bus, and our professional staff makes it easy to plan, schedule, and organize a trip. Whether you’re getting together with a few friends or taking the whole clan on a party bus, Metropolitan Shuttle can help make your trip unforgettable. Call us at 1-866-556-3545 or contact us today for a free quote.


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